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Once Ashamed of My Mexican Immigrant Parents, But Not Anymore

Miguel Juarez Miguel Juarez
05-12-2016
04:14 am UTC

Great article, a must read.

 

Copyright LatinoBayArea.com, All Rights Reserved.  May 11, 2016.

When I first applied to UCLA, I wrote in my personal essay that I didn’t have any positive role models in my violent neighborhood.

[Having grown up in East Los Angeles’ Ramona Gardens housing project, I wrote that most of the adults represented gang members, drug dealers, thieves, tecatos (heroin addicts), alcoholics, felons and high school dropouts (or push-outs). I also wrote about my disdain for housing authority officials and government workers for behaving like prison wardens and guards toward us: project residents who depended on government aid or welfare.  Moreover, I decried the police abuse that I had witnessed and experienced, like the time when a cop pointed a gun at me. My crime: being a 15-year-old making a rolling stop while learning how to drive.   Lastly, as the product of low-performing public schools, I highlighted the low expectations most teachers and counselors had for their poor Chicano...]

Read More: http://latinbayarea.com/wordpress/2016/05/11/ashamed-mexican-immigrant-parents-not-anymore/

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Crossing Paths

Ken Blystone Ken Blystone
05-09-2016
05:56 am UTC

Smelter Cemetery has many graves that are marked only with a plain white cross.  Hundreds of crosses bear no name or date.  It is unknown to me if the size of the crosses indicates a relationship or age.  But I like to think a child is at peace with his or her mother.  You don't have to be old to reach the sunset of your life.  Records from 1901 show the cause of death for many infants as "whooping cough, fever, and born sickly."  The quality of life in Smelter Town was probably like the quality of death.  A pauper's graveyard that makes it impossible to exhume a body to mine for lead.

Crossing Paths

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A New Wrecking Ball

Ken Blystone Ken Blystone
05-03-2016
04:57 am UTC

El Paso has the distinction of being a city using an innovative wrecking ball to smash perfectly good public buildings.  The demolition of buildings are overseen by vicious dogs to make sure no questions are asked or answered.  In our town Sun Kings turn into Diablos and Diablos turn into Chihuahuas and as long as we get to drink beer in public we are satisfied with the mascot.  Soon, taxpayers will be asked to float a bond for a new building since city employees don't have enough space to work.  It's how the game is played.

A New Wrecking Ball

 

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Introduction to Photo Sketches

Ken Blystone Ken Blystone
05-01-2016
12:35 pm UTC

I'm intrigued by the opportunity Chucopedia presents.  I'm in my 4th year of an El Paso photo project and I have been thinking about ways in which to share my photos and my experiences.  I hope you enjoy the content I provide here.  My photos will come with a brief text sketch to give some context or explanation of what appears in the image.  I like humor, satire, irony, and surrealism.  Infusing my pictures with these elements is partly what elevates them to artistic expression.  Photography is my passion.  I've been taking and making pictures for 50+ years. Enjoy!

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Interview with Lise Bjørne Linnert for Desconocida Unknown Ukjent, an art project on the Juárez Femicides

Miguel Juarez Miguel Juarez
05-27-2016
05:51 am UTC

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By Miguel Juárez and Nicolas Silva

Internationally recognized artist Lise Bjørne Linnert, from Oslo, Norway will be speaking about her project titled Desconocida Unknown Ukjent as part of a panel focusing on “Art as Protest,” that seeks to memorialize victims of violence through art at Café Mayapan in El Paso, Texas on Friday, May 27, 2016, at 12 noon. Other panel members include Marisela Ortíz, co-founder of Nuestras Hijas a Regreso a Casa who fled threats in Juárez and received U.S. asylum; Montserrat, a member of Mexicanos en Exilio (Mexicans in Exile), and Miguel Juárez, doctoral candidate, arts advocate and activist and an additional person. Diana Washington-Valdez of Journalists for Justice will be the moderator. The panel is sponsored by The Digie Zone, Journalists for Justice and La Mujer Obrera.

Art has the power to cross and interconnect borders, lives, and memories. Oslo-based artist Lise Bjorne Linnert with Harald Gunnar Paalgard, cinematographer from Dramatiska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden and Marcela Descalzi, a Houston-based educator, and translator, are visiting the El Paso Juárez border and México City to extend the reach of the Desconocida Unknown Ukjent project. The project was initiated in 2006 at a group show in Houston titled "Frontera450+" where Lise was invited to make work about the Juárez femicides alongside artists such as Luis Jimenez and Margarita Cabrera. She developed her final concept of having workshops where communities come together to embroider the names of women affected by violence in Juárez and using the word “Unknown” that symbolizes the people affected by violence everywhere with colorful silk and textiles. These objects created to serve as a participatory awareness activity and “silent protest” against violence everywhere.

Miguel: Lise, can you tell us how you developed Desconocida Unknown Ukjent project?

Lise: In 2006, the Station Museum of Contemporary Art in Houston had an exhibition called “Frontera 450+.”   It was dedicated to the women of Cd. Juárez and they invited me to contribute to a project. I had lived in Houston, but by then I had moved back to Norway.   My first reaction was that I felt so distant to the situation and I asked myself “What can I do?” I wanted to spread awareness of what was really going on, but to do it in a way that would connect without separating into “an us and a them.” After research and consideration, I decided to invite people to embroider the names of the murdered women in Cd. Juárez. I also wanted everyone to embroider an “unknown” in their own language to memorialize individuals in their own society, who were exposed to similar violence, but whose names we didn’t know. The list of names from Cd. Juárez is incomplete, so in many ways, the unknown label stands for both, the “unknowns” in Juárez and the unidentified victims in rest of the world. I wanted the workshops to take place in many different countries. I sent out materials with instructions in envelopes. Soon it developed a life of its own. Because the situation in Juárez didn’t get better, the project continued to grow, and it is still going on today.

Nicolas: Harald, you are an accomplished Norwegian cinematographer. Are you documenting the project? If so, what can you tell us about your experiences documenting Desconocida or traveling with Lise on this journey?

Harald: Yes, in my own way. It’s my way of seeing it.

Lise: Harald is part of it; he is not making a documentary.

Miguel: So, it’s his artistic vision of the project?

Harald: Yes, it´s my vision of the situation, the place, and the meetings.

Miguel: Lise, you include embroidered name tags of other women in other countries, what countries specifically are included in the project? And you mentioned earlier that you had about 7,900 names?

Lise: I think the workshops have been to almost all corners of the world except to the African continent. It’s been to Asia: Japan, Indonesia, Nepal, the Philippines and China. It has been to many countries in Europe, including many places in Norway, Sweden, and Denmark. In the instructions for the workshop, I ask a leader to invite people to sew together as a group. The group can have as few as two participants or it can include all the students in a small university. I’ve lost count of how many workshops have taken place, maybe 500? Out of all the envelopes I have sent, there is only one that was not sent back.

Miguel: To clarify, these are workshops where you send out the materials with instructions on how to create the embroidered nametags and then they send them back to you?

Lise: Yes, I also encourage documentation of their gatherings and they often add poetry, photographs, and other responses. When I exhibit the project, I always invite the local community to participate embroidering the last names added to the list of victims and also ask their help to install the labels. Many participants come back to look for the names they embroidered.

Miguel: It’s like the Vietnam Memorial Wall where people come and touch the wall.

Lise: Yes, you could say it is similar. Because it has been going on for so long, there are many embroidered names and unknown labels. The wall of names began in Cd. Juárez but has grown to become an international memorial. I also see the act of embroidering as a form of protest, a quiet protest but a protest nonetheless.

Miguel: Specifically, who attends these workshops? Do men attend? If you have documentation that men attended, how is it different from a workshop when only women attended?

Lise: These are interesting questions. It’s democratic and open to all. You don’t have to know anything about sewing or embroidery because you receive simple instructions. It’s about the time you give and what happens when you spend that time with that name hearing that story. This is the essence and you will see from the embroidered labels that some of them are done very elaborately and some with more struggle, showing many knots on the back.

Miguel: So the stories are also included, or the biographies of some of the women are included?

Lise: Yes, but if I can, I also show Lourdes Portillo’s film Señorita Extraviada/Missing Young Women (2001). I have been in contact with her and believe the film speaks accurately of what’s going on. Although it was made in 2001, the only difference is that the number of victims is much higher today.  

You asked me about the men. Although it is challenging to get men to participate, they do in small numbers, unless the workshop is in a school, then boys and girls participate equally. I sometimes feel that men may feel as if they are being accused. In the UK, in a town named Chichester, a lot of men came to the workshops and I had to ask why. They answered it was because historically British men would embroider, which made it a natural thing for them to do. Perhaps to get more men involved I should have chosen an activity other than embroidery? Whether men are involved or not, the conversations in the workshops are similar. The act of embroidering does something to you when you speak you speak more intimately.

Many names on the list have been embroidered several times but by different people. This connects to the Catholic belief that when you say names over and over, it is a way of honoring them. I really wanted to find a project that would raise awareness of the violence and the brutality, without celebrating them. The labels are made with silk threads in a rich variety of colors, involving thousands of hands, to bring life to the memory of the women. In contrast to memorials made of stone, embroidered names on the cloth with hanging threads, are soft and alive.

Miguel: There’s a word in Spanish called "presente" when you evoke someone’s name you state, so and so, presente, that they are present in spirit.

Nicolas: I think you touched on this but can you speak about how the tactile, participatory and performative aspects of your work change people and affects them more than doing a painting or something that they view?

Lise: I will try. I decided on embroidery. It wasn’t a method that was present in my work before this project. I wanted the sewing, the repetition and the tactile nature of the project. When you are holding that name, that cloth, that thread, it becomes a presence and it leaves a mark. It plants a seed. You may be more aware when you later encounter similar issues and you may be closer to caring. Every time “Desconocida” is exhibited, I do a performance called “Presence” at the openings. I use my voice to give a loud “Ah” and then go silent, repeating this cycle with variations. The intention is to bring people to the present moment; neither I or they can escape. Similar to embroidering the names, the performance may bring you closer to yourself and open you to engage with the labels.  

Miguel: You’ve mentioned that you have worked on the project for ten years? How long do you intend on continuing the project? I know your answer would probably be “as long as these events keep happening” and a follow-up question, do you see this collection eventually being purchased or how would you want it to be archived?

Lise: Initially, I did not plan to work on it for ten years. However, the violence hasn’t stopped, people continue to participate and the project remains alive. To go back to Juárez and México City now 10 years after the project started is significant for the life of the project. After touring the world, it makes sense to return to where it began. I have great hopes it will now tour Mexico and the US.

Eventually, I would like the project to find a permanent home and not end in my studio. Ideally, it would be displayed to form a bridge to new types of engagement and activism.   In the meantime, it needs to continue its travel. There are always competing demands on us, and sharing the project sustains our attention to this crucial issue.

Nicolas: This is a two-part question. What messages do you hope to get across to the families that you meet and how do you plan to deal with the trauma in regards to yourself and the viewers and participants of the project?

Lise: I met some of the families in 2007 and 2008 through Marisela Ortíz Rivera, co-founder of the organization “Nuestras Hijas de Regreso a Casa” (The return of our daughters to their homes). I have been in contact with her and with Diana [Washington-Valdez] throughout these ten years. I’m bringing all the embroidered labels to the families as proof of solidarity and care for their struggles. This project can never substitute the work they do. In letting them know that others bear witness, my hope is that this will provide comfort and encourage them in their fight. Moreover, the project´s international character can be used by the local activists to add pressure to their Government. Amnesty International, Mexico are interested in a possible collaboration for the coming year.

Miguel: I think this is a very important project and it needs wider exposure in the United States because the femicides are still occurring. A lot has quieted down but it is still happening on a regular basis.

Lise: When I exhibit the project, I install the labels on the wall in Morse code spelling the Mexican and U.S. anthems. The lyrics are interwoven much like the situation in Juárez is inseparable to the border, in the particular, to the NAFTA agreement and the existence of “Maquiladoras”.

Miguel: Has there been any criticism of the project in your country, have people asked you “Why are you doing this?”

Lise: There have been many asking, “Why are you so involved in something happening in Cd. Juárez?” My answer is that it is not only happening in Juárez. The violence against women happens in every society, whether poor or rich. It is an issue affecting all of us. I remember an embroidery workshop in Tel Aviv and some students asked: “Why would we care about what happens in México when we have enough to deal with here?” But after we embroidered, they said it was good to care. That’s what I believe, even if you start focusing on an issue far away, you begin to see similarities which resonate with your country, city, and neighborhood. I want us to ask ourselves how things are where we live.

Miguel: My last question, what do you want people who may hear or read about your project to take away from it?

Lise: I believe this project, in addition to bringing awareness to a horrific situation, also contains hope. There is hope if we get involved. It may sound idealistic but that is what I believe. I trust that art can serve as a critical voice and reach people differently. Like Eleanor Roosevelt stated, “Where after all do universal human rights begin? In small places…close to home…so close and so small that they cannot be seen on any maps of the world.”

I want to add that the Desconocida Unknown Ukjent project is generously supported by the Norwegian Art Council; the Institution Fritt Ord  (Freedom of Speech); Norwegian Craft; The Norwegian Artists Association Sponsorship and OCA. 

Miguel: Okay, thank you, Lise and Harald, for this interview.

Nicolas: Thank you.

 

Miguel Juárez is a doctoral candidate in history at the University of Texas at El Paso.  His research focuses on cultural issues along the U.S.-Mexico border. You can follow him on Twitter @miguelJuárez.

Nicolas Silva is a multidisciplinary researcher, thinker, writer, and artist. He graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Microbiology at UTEP and hopes to make science fiction a reality. Follow him on Twitter @nicodsilva.

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Messengers and More

Ken Blystone Ken Blystone
05-25-2016
08:50 pm UTC

Forget not to show love unto strangers: for thereby some have entertained angels unawares.—Hebrews 13:2.  They are there and it may be obvious or not.  You may be blessed to see or interact with an angel.  It could be as simple as you are willing to open your eyes and see what is right in front of you.  Yet, some only see clouds in the sky.  And some don't realize the man you meet on a motorcycle is a stranger to whom you may want to show love.  Besides, a lot of guys on motorcycles riding in the lower valley know the best places to get enchiladas.

Messengers and More

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Mighty Mujers

Ken Blystone Ken Blystone
05-14-2016
02:45 am UTC

Every spring women in El Paso are invited to participate in a triathlon that includes swimming, a bike ride, and finally a run to the finish.  The "Mighty Mujer" competition takes place in the scenic Memorial Park area along the foothills of the Franklin Mountains.  A portion of the bike race includes riding down El Paso's Alabama Street at speeds up to 50 mph.  Many people line the route to cheer the women on as they speed by.

Mighty Mujers

 

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Martín Shared Of Course Facebook Is Biased. That's How Tech Works Today

Martín Paredes Martín Paredes
05-11-2016
01:11 pm UTC

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The underlining reason I launched Chucopedia is that I believe that the community, not the owners or administrators of an online community, should be the ones to control what is seen on their news feeds. Many reports have recently come out alleging that Facebook censors users' news feeds, mostly burying conservative news sites. When you empower one individual, or a group of individuals to determine what is acceptable to the online community then abuse becomes the norm.

The concept behind Chucopedia is to allow the community members to self-police themselves by voting up or down posts that they see on their news feeds. The Chucopedia algorithm model is simple, the more thumbs up votes the higher the post appears on the news feed. The more thumbs down the post receives, the deeper the post is buried in the news feed. In other words, you the viewer controls what is on the news feed.


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Of Course Facebook Is Biased. That's How Tech Works Today

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www.wired.com

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“This is what it looked like when the U.S.-Mexico border opened for 3 minutes”

Miguel Juarez Miguel Juarez
05-06-2016
05:44 pm UTC

Copyright © 2016 Fusion Media Network, LLC. All Rights Reserved. May 3, 2016.

[On Sunday five families separated by the U.S.-Mexico border gathered on both sides of the fence dividing San Diego from Tijuana in hopes of briefly embracing their loved ones. The initiative, called “Opening the Door of Hope,” was a joint effort by the U.S. Border Patrol and pro-immigration NGO Border Angels to momentarily open the gates at Friendship Park, which divides the two nations. The symbolic event, an act to commemorate Children’s Day, allowed five chosen families to reunite for a brief and tearful 3-minute hug. Prior to the event, the families underwent a selection process in which they were screened by both border patrol and the NGO. The emotional images are a painful reminder of what a broken immigration system looks like, and the human toll it takes on families divided. This is the third such border opening in the past four years. The first one happened in 2013 when Border Angels director Enrique Morones convinced border patrol to open the Tijuana-San Diego border for a couple of minutes.  “We told them it would be something powerful and that it would make them look good,” Morones told Fusion. But border patrol got nervous when a little girl ran towards her dad and jumped in his arms without giving prior warning. Morones says that caused the agency to cancel the event the following year, but it returned last year when four families were given a brief moment to hug…]

Read more: http://fusion.net/story/297223/this-is-what-it-looked-like-when-the-u-s-mexico-border-opened-for-3-minutes/

 

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“Life After Death in Juarez: Soccer Returns to a City Damaged by Narco-Violence”

Miguel Juarez Miguel Juarez
05-04-2016
05:12 am UTC

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Interesting article on Cd. Juarez's rebirth.

Vice Sports © 2016, All Rights Reserved, May 3, 2016.

[The soccer stadium in Ciudad Juárez looks pretty good these days. It's been painted, outside and in. The advertising banners ringing the stadium are new and have been washed clean from a sandstorm that rolled through last night. Cemento Chihuahua, Coca-Cola. The most prominent banner is not really an ad but just a picture of Pope Francis smiling down at the players warming up on the field. An hour before kickoff, taco vendors work their carts in the parking lot, drawing me outside with their sizzle. A truck from one of the national networks aims its satellite dish skyward. Still standing on an adjacent lot is the giant altar where Pope Francis himself held mass, only a couple months ago. It feels almost rude to think about the severed head. I am thinking about it, though. I distinctly remember the severed head found here at the stadium. It belonged to a federal police officer, a guy murdered and dismembered before his body parts were scattered along the river that separates Juárez from El Paso, Texas. His head, deliberately, for maximum shock value, landed at the stadium. That was not so long ago, 2010. Or maybe it was a very long time ago because no one here is talking about it, or about any of the other killings that made Juárez the murder capital of the world back then, when I used to live here.  What everyone tells me instead is that Juárez is better now…]

Read more: https://sports.vice.com/en_us/article/life-after-death-in-juarez-soccer-returns-to-a-city-damaged-by-narco-violence

 

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Thanks Martin

Michiel Noe Michiel Noe
05-01-2016
05:24 pm UTC

I'm looking forward to see how this works out.  I know it's just a Beta Version but it seems to have been put together very well. 

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Article Temporary Removed by Author

Miguel Juarez Miguel Juarez
04-29-2016
03:41 pm UTC


 
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Welcome to Chucopedia News

Martín Paredes Martín Paredes
04-28-2016
08:43 pm UTC

Hello and welcome to the inaugural launch of the Chucopedia News platform. I hope you are as excited about the site as I am. Please note that we are still in BETA testing. I will be turning on features today and through the weekend. Don’t worry, you can begin to post and interact. I’ll be making announcements as I turn on the features.

Feel free to play with the fonts until you find one that suits your personality. You can create tables and bullet points.

Here is a quick run up about Chucopedia News. It is a place to discuss news, share items and post commentary or notes about the borderland. You are in control. You will notice the thumbs up and thumbs down buttons. Rather than have administrators monitor, you the community, determines what is good for Chucopedia News by voting the things that you like up and voting the things you don’t like down.

Those items that get the most thumbs up are shown at the top of your feed while those that get thumbs down are pushed off of the feed.

In the coming weeks I will be adding a sharing button, a place to upload pictures and hashtags so that you can group items together.

This is your community, so by all means ask me questions and suggest things you would like to see.

Welcome aboard and I look forward to your posts and shares.

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Re-branding El Paso Neighborhoods

Miguel Juarez Miguel Juarez
05-22-2016
05:08 am UTC

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At the last El Paso City Council Meeting City Manager Tommy Gonzalez proposed the El Paso Gateway Sites or "Sun City Lights" Project.   Here we go again, more public art at the entrances to our city created by out-of-town artists! 

Newsflash: We have great artists in El Paso who can create these materials. 

Watch for yourself: Watch City 15 - City Council Meetings are cablecast "live" at 8:00 A.M. on Tuesdays and replayed Tuesdays at 6 P.M. and Sundays at 12:00 Noon. 

KVIA's report on the project that they are supporting because they have given it a positive headline: http://www.kvia.com/news/new-proposal-to-beautify-el-paso-with-art-and-lights/39605560?utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook_KVIA_ABC-7

What do you think of this project?

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“Today we are traitors to ourselves, as we were 70 years ago”

Miguel Juarez Miguel Juarez
05-06-2016
05:48 pm UTC

Copyright © 2016 Fairfax Media, The Age (Australia), All rights reserved. May 5, 2016.

[We are unquestionably facing one of the biggest challenges of modern times.  A human tide of desperation affecting more than 60 million people worldwide, fleeing war-ravaged countries in search of refuge. There are now more displaced people and refugees in the world than at any other time in recorded history. In Turkey alone, two million refugees have crossed the borders from Syria and Iraq. A dangerous journey starting out with hope and yet so often ending with desperate people willing to risk everything for a new life.  Yet it's how this flood of human misery is playing out on a political level throughout Europe, the Middle East and here in Australia, that is alarming. For decades, triggered by wars and prejudice, governments have grappled with the refugee issue. But more telling has been the notion that somehow by showing compassion to people who have fled war-torn homelands with virtually nothing, it will equate to them losing office. None more so than here in Australia, as history shows. Both sides of my family came here as refugees. My father, Phillip, was forced to flee Germany before the outbreak of World War II because of his Jewish ancestry. Jailed by the Nazis for openly ridiculing their Aryan doctrine, he was extremely lucky to be released, only due to the rapidly dwindling influence my grandfather still wielded as president of the Appeal Court. Together with his parents, their quest for a safe haven brought them to Australia.  In another part of the world my mother, Josephine, who was born in Harbin in China to a Russian mother and Czech father, was just a young girl when her family prepared to flee Manchuria after the Japanese invasion. As refugees they fled with virtually nothing, making the long and, at times, hazardous trip to forge a new life in Australia…]

Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/comment/today-we-are-traitors-to-ourselves-as-we-were-70-years-ago-20160505-gomquy.html#ixzz47qPNFXuD

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“How Russia and China Are Cooperating to Dismantle America’s Dominance on the Internet”

Miguel Juarez Miguel Juarez
05-06-2016
05:47 pm UTC

Copyright © 2016, The World Post, All Rights Reserved, May 5, 2016.

[Did the Cold War even end? Moscow and Beijing, deeply resentful of American power, are again finding an ideological common cause, jointly aiming at two pillars of the post-Cold War dispensation: a borderless Internet and international civil society. They are doing so on the declared basis of national sovereignty. Modern nationalism has proved much sturdier than Communist internationalism; besides, the jaded, if not cynical, Sino-Russian approach to globalization has more than an echo of resurgent nationalism in the West itself, not least with regard to the Internet. If this is not quite a Cold War, it is hard to see how such trends can lead, in any way, to peace or to prosperity. Last Wednesday, the first China-Russia forum on Internet sovereignty took place in Moscow under the auspices of Russia’s government-endorsed Safe Internet League. The next day, China’s legislature passed a law mandating tight management by security organs of international non-governmental organizations. The timing of the events was coincidental but the ideological ties between them were not. Russia has long advocated national control of international NGOs. For post-Soviet Russians, the notion that international NGOs could be, in effect, agents of destabilization should probably be dated to the late 1990s and the opposition to Serbian president Slobodan Milosevic. NGOs played an especially prominent role in the overthrow of Milosevic, a Russian ally. There was even a theory loosely adopted by some of them: “nonviolent action,” as pioneered by Mahatma Gandhi, refracted through the mind of an American, Gene Sharp, and advocated by, among others, Sharp’s student Peter Ackerman. Sharp had been to Tiananmen Square in 1989 and co-wrote an account of the last days of the protest there…]

Read more: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/scott-malcomson/russia-china-internet_b_9841670.html

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Martín Shared Council refuses to excuse Larry Romero's absence again

Martín Paredes Martín Paredes
05-04-2016
07:14 pm UTC

It is about time that city council took action to protect the interests of the taxpayers!


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Council refuses to excuse Larry Romero's absence again

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www.kvia.com

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“Berta Caceres murder: four men arrested over Honduran activist’s death”

Miguel Juarez Miguel Juarez
05-04-2016
05:19 pm UTC

Maybe justice will be served.

The Guardian, © 2016, All Rights Reserved. May 2, 2016.

[Four men have been arrested in connection with the murder of the Honduran indigenous activist Berta Cáceres, who was shot dead dead at her home two months ago. Two of those arrested are linked to the company building a hydroelectric dam which Cáceres had campaigned against. Sergio Ramón Rodriguez, an engineer for the Agua Zarca dam being built by Desarrollos Energéticos SA (Desa), and Douglas Geovanny Bustillo, a retired military officer and the former head of Desa’s security detail, were both detained on Monday morning, according to the Honduran public prosecutor’s office. The four men were due to appear before a judge later on Monday, where prosecutors will outline their alleged links to the crime. Cáceres, who last year won the Goldman environmental prize for her work opposing the Agua Zarca dam on the Gualcarque River, had previously reported both men to authorities for making threats against her life.  Rodriguez had allegedly threatened Cáceres just days before her death as she led a protest by her group the Civic Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras (Copinh) to the river which is considered sacred by the indigenous Lenca people. Cáceres reported the incident to the authorities, and accused Desa of using local thugs to intimidate her…]

Read more: http://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/may/02/berta-caceres-murder-four-men-arrested-honduras?CMP=share_btn_link

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“Missing Mexican Students Suffered a Night of ‘Terror,’ Investigators Say”

Miguel Juarez Miguel Juarez
05-04-2016
04:29 pm UTC

These students deserved better.  We must not forget them.

New York Times © 2016, All Rights Reserved, April 24, 2016

[MEXICO CITY — Municipal police officers encircled the bus, detonated tear gas, punctured the tires and forced the college students who were onboard to get off. “We’re going to kill all of you,” the officers warned, according to the bus driver. A policeman approached the driver and pointed a pistol at his chest. “You, too,” the officer said. With a military intelligence official looking on and state and federal police officers in the immediate vicinity, witnesses said, the students were put into police vehicles and taken away. They have not been seen since.  They were among the 43 students who vanished in the city of Iguala one night in September 2014 amid violent, chaotic circumstances laid bare by an international panel of investigators who have been examining the matter for more than a year. The reason for the students’ abduction remains a mystery. Despite apparent stonewalling by the Mexican government in recent months, the panel’s two reports on the case, the most recent of which was released on Sunday, provide the fullest accounting of the events surrounding the students’ disappearance, which also left six other people dead, including three students, and scores wounded. The reports describe a night of confusion and terror for the students and city residents, and a seemingly clinical, coordinated harvest by Mexican law enforcement officials and other gunmen operating in and around Iguala, in Guerrero, one of Mexico's poorest and most violent states. The government said 123 people, including 73 municipal police officials, had been detained on organized-crime charges in relation to the night’s events, and the Mexican authorities have linked the Iguala police force to a powerful drug gang. The 43 students were undergraduates at Escuela Normal Rural Raúl Isidro Burgos, a teachers college, in Ayotzinapa, with a history of activism…]

Read more: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/25/world/americas/missing-mexican-students-suffered-a-night-of-terror-investigators-say.html?emc=eta1&_r=0

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San Jacinto Plaza Redesign Committee Pop Quiz

Miguel Juarez Miguel Juarez
05-03-2016
10:29 pm UTC

Pop Quiz

(Each question worth 20 points)

  1. The City of El Paso acquired San Jacinto Plaza in 1881 from:
  2. a) The Tap
  3. b) T.J. Karam and Associates
  4. c) William T. Smith
  1. In 1903, the City officially named the Plaza in honor of:
  2. a) Chicos Tacos
  3. b) Peter Svarzbein
  4. b) The Battle of San Jacinto
  1. According to Nestor Valencia, the Plaza has been redesigned:
  2. By Melvin Moore in his spare time
  3. By Mathew McElroy using Google SketchUp
  4. Three times
  1. In 1983, the City commissioned a sculpture for San Jacinto Plaza by:
  2. a) Joel Guzman
  3. b) Luis Jimenez Jr.
  4. c) Katherine Brennand
  1. The “Los Lagartos” sculpture was built for $50,000 in 1993, it is now valued at:
  2. a) Less than a Bugatti Veyron Super
  3. b) $250,000
  4. c) Enough to solve the national deficit

 

*I'm not sure why numerals appear in front of letters?

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Commenting and Image Uploads are now open on Chucopedia News

Martín Paredes Martín Paredes
05-03-2016
09:15 pm UTC

Responsive image


Hello everyone!

Just a quick note to let you know that you can now leave comments on your posts and upload pictures. Remember, you can also vote on your favorite conversations.

To upload a picture, write your post and save it. Go back to the feed wall and click on the image icon. (eventually I'll make this a one-step process)

By the way, you can also now edit your posts.

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The votes are now live!

Martín Paredes Martín Paredes
05-02-2016
09:20 pm UTC

Responsive image


Hello everyone!

Thank you for your comments, suggestions and especially the support as I get this project of the ground. The problem with posts being cutoff has been resolved. I have also turned on the voting buttons. As of now, you can vote on the posts.

Remember, you can only vote once per post so think about your vote before casting it. I have also disabled the ability to vote on your own content.

Tomorrow I plan on turning on the commenting feature.

I am also planning on turning on the ability to add pictures to your posts tomorrow. I will post an update here as soon as that is ready.

I am also planning on adding a share button so that you can share content from other websites easily.

Finally, I will add an edit option so that you can edit your posts.

Please keep your comments and suggestions coming.

Thanks again,

Martin

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What do you think of this new space?

Miguel Juarez Miguel Juarez
04-28-2016
08:44 pm UTC

On the onset, this space may offer some challenges to compete against other social media, but a start is start.

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About


Chucopedia News is a place to discuss, share and contribute news about the borderland. There are no administrators to tell you what’s allowed and what isn’t. You, the membership determines what shows up on your wall every time you visit Chucopedia News.

That’s right, you, the members determine what is relevant for the Chucopedia News page.

You do this simply by participating. Any member of Chucopedia News can share anything they like.

Each member of the Chucopedia News community gets to vote on each posting. You can vote it up or down. The more “up” votes a post gets, the higher it shows up on your feeds. The more “down” votes a post gets, the lower it gets buried into the feed wall until it doesn’t show up again. Each member is allowed only one vote per post.

As you can see, it is you who police’s the new feed, not some ambiguous administrator. To keep the integrity of the votes intact, each of you can view the vote log for each post.

Since it is your community, you get the most out of it by your involvement.

The conversation can be anything you share. For example, you might want to share a news item you saw somewhere, or you might want to discuss something on your mind. Maybe you want to share a picture. Or, maybe you want to post a note on a topic.

Sometimes you don’t have anything to share or notes to write. However, you might want to comment on a post. Chucopedia News allows you to comment on any post. And, like the conversations, the members can vote up or down a comment. Again keeping the site’s conversations relevant to what you feel is important for the online community.

New features will be added each week. A robust events calendar and surveys and polls.

Chucopedia News is built on a robust platform that offer features that allow anyone interested in organizing grassroots efforts or even clubs to use it for free. There is a built-in membership module that will allow anyone to organize their network. It’s free to use for everyone.

Chucopedia News is also an archive of open source material derived from open records requests to various government agencies.

There are many community activists filing open records request with various organizations. The results of these investigative resources are scattered all over the place. Many times, duplicated efforts are created thus costing you and the taxpayers unnecessary expenses.

The plan is to create an open source archive of original source documents that can be accessed by any of the members of Chucopedia News.

Each of your files, plus the community files are searchable by keywords and other metrics. I am hoping that in time we will have built an archive of original materials that are searchable and organized for researchers to use by the community at large.

Welcome to the Chucopedia News site. Remember it is your community so expect to see only what is of interest to you.